Indoor plants

Croton

The thousand colors of croton

Lovers of bright and bright colors cannot ignore the cultivation of one of the most colorful plants offered by nature: the croton, with its leaves with different colored veins, is a plant of great charm that immediately captures the attention precisely because of its of the coexistence of leaves of very different colors. The leaves are large and densely developed, creating a spot of color that cannot go unnoticed. Depending on the species, the various croton plants will show differences in terms of size, shape of leaves and colors: all, however, are characterized by the polychromy that makes them among the most fascinating plants of Asian origin and therefore extremely spread in our gardens. To the diffusion of thecroton also contribute other factors, among which the small size: the various species do not, however, exceed one meter in height. The croton is ideal, therefore, also as a houseplant, even if in our areas it is difficult for flowering to occur, normally present in summer for plants in their natural environment and composed of long stems with small white flowers collected in inflorescences .

Cultivation


Being an Asian plant, the croton is not used to very cold temperatures and for this reason we tend to practice cultivation in pots, in order to be able to withdraw the plant to the shelter during the winter period. The croton requires placing in humid environments and fears the climatic changes. It needs abundant lighting, but it is advisable to avoid direct exposure to sunlight or near windows, to prevent the leaves from being burned. Watering must also be frequent, allowing the soil to always retain a certain degree of humidity without creating water stagnations that favor the proliferation of parasites and fungi. Rather than overdoing the watering, therefore, it is advisable to provide moderate but frequent quantities and to nebulize the leaves even on a daily basis during the summer, when the temperatures are higher and the climate is likely to be too dry. The rapid development of the plant can be helped through a good fertilization, to be diluted in the watering during the vegetative recovery period of the plant and throughout the summer season. While in summer fertilization will be provided twice a week, in the winter period it will be sufficient to intervene every two months. watering water during the vegetative restart period of the plant and throughout the summer season. While in summer fertilization will be provided twice a week, in the winter period it will be sufficient to intervene every two months. watering water during the vegetative restart period of the plant and throughout the summer season. While in summer fertilization will be provided twice a week, in the winter period it will be sufficient to intervene every two months.

Multiplication and pruning


Since the croton tends to develop quickly, pruning is the most effective tool to control its growth and to give it its preferred shape. The plant, in fact, tends to develop in height giving rise to sparse leaves but, if properly pruned in the apical part, it will remain lower and will give life to a denser foliage, of greater charm since the crown will be characterized by more colors. close together. However, traditional pruning must also be carried out to contain lateral development and to eliminate dry branches, which unnecessarily steal nourishment from the plant. With pruning, the croton will be invigorated and more resistant to pest attacks. Reproduction occurs mainly by cuttings: it is necessary to take portions of the branch of about 10 cm with leaves and buds that will give life to the new plant. The branch thus obtained must be placed in a rhizomatous solution to favor rooting and then inside peat and sand. The cutting is then covered with insulating and transparent material that guarantees humidity, light filtering and an average temperature of about 25 degrees: this will create the optimal conditions for the development of the plant until the development of the first shoots, when the pot can be placed. in a bright area no longer needing to be isolated. Finally, when the plant has reached about 15 cm in height, it should be placed in the soil indicated for adult plants. The branch thus obtained must be placed in a rhizomatous solution to favor rooting and then inside peat and sand. The cutting is then covered with insulating and transparent material that guarantees humidity, light filtering and an average temperature of about 25 degrees: this will create the optimal conditions for the development of the plant until the development of the first shoots, when the pot can be placed. in a bright area no longer needing to be isolated. Finally, when the plant has reached about 15 cm in height, it should be placed in the soil indicated for adult plants. The branch thus obtained must be placed in a rhizomatous solution to favor rooting and then inside peat and sand. The cutting is then covered with insulating and transparent material that guarantees humidity, light filtering and an average temperature of about 25 degrees: this will create the optimal conditions for the development of the plant until the development of the first shoots, when the pot can be placed. in a bright area no longer needing to be isolated. Finally, when the plant has reached about 15 cm in height, it should be placed in the soil indicated for adult plants. In this way, the optimal conditions for the development of the plant will be created up to the development of the first shoots, when the pot can be placed in a bright area without needing to be isolated. Finally, when the plant has reached about 15 cm in height, it should be placed in the soil indicated for adult plants. In this way, the optimal conditions for the development of the plant will be created up to the development of the first shoots, when the pot can be placed in a bright area without needing to be isolated. Finally, when the plant has reached about 15 cm in height, it should be placed in the soil indicated for adult plants.

Croton: Diseases and pests


Observing the croton leaves is not only a pleasure, it is also the best tool to determine if the plant is healthy or not. The fall of the leaves is the first symptom of some error in the care: it can be a matter of low humidity in the environment or watering that is too rare or too abundant. Even poor lighting can be a cause of suffering for the plant: once the primary cause of the suffering of the croton has been identified, it is sufficient to modify this habit and recreate the optimal conditions for its development in order to see the plant resume flourishing. As for external attacks, however, the most widespread enemy of the croton is the cochineal, a parasite that causes yellow and brown spots on the leaves and subsequently their fall. Identifying the presence of cochineal or other parasites in a timely manner will allow to intervene before the plant can report too serious damage: if the colonization is at an early stage it is possible to remove the parasites present with a cotton soaked in alcohol. However, if it is not possible to eliminate every pest organism in this way, a specific pesticide must be used, which can completely eliminate the presence of these parasites. Otherwise, they would resume proliferating even after treatment, requiring further interventions. However, if it is not possible to eliminate every pest organism in this way, a specific pesticide must be used, which can completely eliminate the presence of these parasites. Otherwise, they would resume proliferating even after treatment, requiring further interventions. However, if it is not possible to eliminate every pest organism in this way, a specific pesticide must be used, which can completely eliminate the presence of these parasites. Otherwise, they would resume proliferating even after treatment, requiring further interventions.

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