Bulbs

Iris

Iris

For the beauty of their flowers they are often confused with orchids and for their bearing they are used to decorate hedges, borders, but also ponds. We are talking about iris plants, bulbous and rhizomatous species native to both Asia and Europe. Of these plants, there are about two hundred species and perhaps more. What makes them more appreciated are their high ornamental value, the beauty of the flowers and the ease of cultivation. In fact, iris is the plant that is by far the simplest to grow, even if minimal care must be followed, at least to ensure proper growth and flowering. All the cultivation practices for iris, which we will decree in the following paragraphs, are not difficult to follow, even for those who are not gardening experts. The iris, in fact, it does not require particular soils and has no specific water requirements. The important thing is to know the different characteristics of the rhizomatous and bulbous species.

Features


As already mentioned in the previous paragraph, iris plants are bulbous and rhizomatous species native to Asia and Europe. The difference between the two species lies in the underground part intended for the reproduction of the plant: in the first case it is represented by a bulb, small, elongated, of yellow or brown color, while in the second, by the rhizome, a root with swelling that acts as a reserve nutritional. The Asian varieties are frequently rhizomatous and typical of hot humid climates, while the bulbous ones are often European and also suitable for harsh climates. Iris plants can reach up to two meters in height. There are dwarf species whose stem does not exceed thirty centimeters. Bulbous species are used to decorate hedges and borders, while the rhizomatous ones like to develop in very humid substrates and for this reason they are also suitable for the decoration of small lakes and bodies of water. The iris also features flowers with three straight inner petals and three drooping outer petals. The color of the inflorescences varies according to the species. In the bulbous ones it varies from yellow, to blue, to purple, while in the rhizomatous ones it is white, with two-colored bracts or tending to violet. The leaves are long, erect and sharp. The iris belongs to the Iridaceae family and the name derives from the homonymous Greek word which means «rainbow». The flower of the plant is commonly known as orris. The color of the inflorescences varies according to the species. In the bulbous ones it varies from yellow, to blue, to purple, while in the rhizomatous ones it is white, with two-colored bracts or tending to violet. The leaves are long, erect and sharp. The iris belongs to the Iridaceae family and the name derives from the homonymous Greek word which means «rainbow». The flower of the plant is commonly known as orris. The color of the inflorescences varies according to the species. In the bulbous ones it varies from yellow, to blue, to purple, while in the rhizomatous ones it is white, with two-colored bracts or tending to violet. The leaves are long, erect and sharp. The iris belongs to the Iridaceae family and the name derives from the homonymous Greek word which means «rainbow». The flower of the plant is commonly known as orris.

Variety


While reading the previous paragraphs you will have learned that there are numerous varieties of iris, both rhizomatous and bulbous. Also in this case, as has happened for other insights, it is not possible to list them all, which is why it seems right to remember only the best known and most cultivated varieties. Among the rhizomatous species we remember the iris germanica and the iris pupila. The first reaches even one meter in height, while the second is considered a «dwarf» variety because its stem does not exceed thirty centimeters. Among the most known bulbous species we remember the iris hollandica and the reticulated iris. The first has flowers in various colors of yellow, white, lilac and blue and has a spring bloom, while the second has exclusively purple colored flowers.

Cultivation


The cultivation of iris is extremely simple to practice: the plant does not have particular cultural needs, but only of environment and exposure, which must be calibrated according to the chosen species. There are, in fact, varieties of iris that love warm and mild temperatures and others that resist even more rigid climates. The species of hot countries, or rhizomatous ones, should not be exposed to temperatures below twelve degrees. These species prefer shady, humid areas and stretches of water; they are, in fact, cultivated to decorate ponds or garden bodies of water. Bulbous varieties also resist cold, but prefer a sunny exposure. The substrate of bulbous species can also be dry. For their easy adaptability to any type of substrate, bulbous iris can be grown not only to decorate hedges and flower beds, but also for growing in pots. Dwarf varieties are generally used to create decorated areas on the ground.

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