Medicinal plants

Chestnut

The chestnut

The chestnut is an extremely widespread plant in our country, precisely because it is able to grow and develop as spontaneous vegetation. The simplicity of its cultivation, even if it takes years to grow a chestnut, combines with the many beneficial properties that make this plant a precious cultivation, to be used in the kitchen, phytotherapy, herbal medicine and medicine but also, more simply, to decorate the space in which the chestnut is cultivated: in particular in the autumn period, its leaves are colored red and orange and add charm to the whole area where the plants are located. These characteristics make chestnut trees precious and to be preserved, precisely because their development is slow and before reaching adulthood a chestnut can take up to fifty years.

Properties and benefits


The chestnut is able to offer not only great beauty, but also many beneficial properties that are exploited in the most diverse ways. Since ancient times this plant has been loved and appreciated for the many benefits it is able to bring to man: different parts of the chestnut are used, for equally varied purposes ranging from the medical field to that of cosmetics and nutrition. Many parts of the chestnut are used: the fruits, the leaves, the bark and also the buds, rich in active ingredients. Phytotherapeutic and herbal preparations are obtained from the leaves and bark. The leaves, in particular, can be used for decoctions that can act as effective cough relievers, while the decoctions obtained with the bark have a purifying effect on the intestine and are useful in case of dysentery. The decoctions of chestnut leaves can also be used preventively as a natural mouthwash, while the decoctions deriving from the bark can prove to be important allies in case of intestinal disorders. The gems, on the other hand, are used to make products that counteract the symptoms of rheumatism and promote microcirculation: the consequences therefore also affect an improvement in cellulite, if present.

Chestnuts in the kitchen


The chestnut is one of the most versatile plants in the area: its properties have been known since ancient times, thanks to the great diffusion of the plant in the Mediterranean area. Using the different parts of the plant is a practice already known even in past times, when however the first way to exploit the resources of the plants was to eat the fruits. Also in this case, chestnuts in the kitchen are rich in taste but also very precious resources for well-being. Chestnuts, in fact, are very rich in beneficial substances and nutritional elements: they are rich in carbohydrates, but also in fiber, vitamins, proteins, fats and minerals including sodium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese. For this reason, chestnuts are usually avoided in slimming diets, while they are recommended in case of anemia and loss of appetite. Being rich in folic acid, chestnuts are also recommended for pregnant women, as they can prevent the onset of malformations in the fetus. Chestnuts can be used as the basis of tasty recipes or eaten naturally: there are no particular indications for their consumption, taking into account the fact, previously explained, that they are foods particularly rich in nutrients and calories. Due to the richness of carbohydrates and the conversion into simple sugars during cooking, chestnuts are also not recommended for people with diabetes. onset of malformations in the fetus. Chestnuts can be used as the basis of tasty recipes or eaten naturally: there are no particular indications for their consumption, taking into account the fact, previously explained, that they are foods particularly rich in nutrients and calories. Due to the richness of carbohydrates and the conversion into simple sugars during cooking, chestnuts are also not recommended for people with diabetes. onset of malformations in the fetus. Chestnuts can be used as the basis of tasty recipes or eaten naturally: there are no particular indications for their consumption, taking into account the fact, previously explained, that they are foods particularly rich in nutrients and calories. Due to the richness of carbohydrates and the conversion into simple sugars during cooking, chestnuts are also not recommended for people with diabetes.

Chestnut: Cosmetics


Chestnuts are widespread in herbal medicine, but also in herbal medicine, where the physical benefits intersect with those related to beauty: it is not such, in fact, if it is not accompanied by health. Extracts from the richest parts of chestnuts in active ingredients are used for products designed to restore intestinal balance and to purify, counteracting water retention, but also to fight cellulite. The products of this type can be used without particular contraindications and without risks for the combination with other products or any drugs. Other resources are perhaps less known, but equally used: in fact, natural pigments are obtained from chestnut for hair dyes, to obtain warm mahogany nuances. Especially in the autumn period,

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