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Ficus retusa bonsai

Furnishing plants

The world of plants is a varied and varied universe that knows how to offer those who admire and are interested in it an extraordinary panorama of possibilities; for example, among the many “unofficial” classifications, ie unscientific ones, there are some very bizarre ones, but in this article we focus on one of them that is among the most widespread: furnishing plants. In fact it seems a bit strange to define a plant in this way, but with this denomination we want to designate that group of plant species that for particular reasons find a very suitable use in the furnishing of corners of houses, apartments and gardens. It should be noted that when we talk about furnishing plants we refer more to those intended for closed environments, as those that can furnish a garden (in terms of size and resistance to atmospheric changes) are classified – in fact – as garden plants. Many people, under the pressure of a slightly obtuse naturalistic spirit, protest against this intended use, citing the reasons that they are living beings. We absolutely agree, but it is also true that for these species, letting them live in an apartment is saving their life and guaranteeing survival.

The right features


Obviously the plants that will have the task of furnishing a house and delighting those who live there with scents and colors must have the right characteristics to do so; summarizing them here could be a difficult task as it is a mix of very variable compositions, but we certainly try. First of all, there are two types of very important characteristics, the aesthetic ones and the survival ones: even if we want to avoid wanting to be so pragmatic as to be cynical, a plant that must furnish must undoubtedly be “beautiful”, that is, pleasing to the eye, harmonious; then the plant must be able to feel good in a confined environment such as our homes, so it must not suffer and die from dry air, low humidity and approximately constant temperatures with little homogeneous lighting. This is why we mentioned earlier that confining a plant at home is not mistreating it, both because we will give it all the possible treatments to make it survive and because in the external environment it would certainly die. Sometimes this mix of characteristics that decree a furnishing plant is natural, spontaneous and inherent in the genetic characteristics of the plant, while other times it is the man who used the experimentation “a la Mendel” to find the solution to his needs.

Bonsai

One of the most fascinating furnishing plants in the world is bonsai: obviously everyone – or almost everyone – will know that bonsai is not a species of plant but it is a cultural technique that can be applied in theory to all plants but that in reality it is fits perfectly with a limited number of them, for fantastic results. In short, this collection of techniques aims to keep the size of the plant very small without affecting its maturation, that is, we do not have small plants because they are still young but we have very small “adult” plants; very often this happens with a very targeted pruning studied over years of experimentation, together with the use of levers, tie rods, fixings that “harness” the plant, keeping it small. All this, according to what historical scholars and archaeologists report, it seems to have been born in the East and precisely in China around the sixth century after Christ; in fact this is the first scientific proof of this technique, but the tradition has subsequently moved to Japan (here the first discovery / testimony is from the thirteenth century after Christ) where today there is a huge tradition, very integrated in the culture of the population that stands the bonsai as a symbol of themselves.

Ficus retusa bonsai

Ficus retusa is classified in the group of the best plants for the bonsai technique: it is a tree of the Moraceae group, one of the many species of ficus existing in the world. These plants, with characteristics that are also very different from each other, are native to the mid-tropical belt that goes from the Mediterranean to almost the Far East and in this latter destination they have found consecration as an ornamental plant with bonsai technique. The ficus retusa bears very well the growth in bonsai format, also managing to present a thick crown, of a bright green tending to yellow and with alternating leaves, numerous and also very resistant and very firm. The environmental preferences that the ficus retusa has are not demanding, on the contrary: precisely due to the fact that it has turgid leaves and also of important dimensions, he is able to withstand the low humidity of our heated apartments and, moreover, normal lighting (never direct) is enough to live very well. Not only that, among its characteristics there are very decorative aerial roots, which are often enhanced through cultivation on rock, without the earth that covers and hides them. Therefore, a vaporization on the foliage is required, or a spray of water that a little refreshes and moistens the leaves and a little nourishes (in the true sense of the word) the plant through the aerial roots. which are often enhanced through cultivation on rock, without the earth that covers and hides them. Therefore, a vaporization on the foliage is required, or a spray of water that a little refreshes and moistens the leaves and a little nourishes (in the true sense of the word) the plant through the aerial roots. which are often enhanced through cultivation on rock, without the earth that covers and hides them. Therefore we need a vaporization on the foliage, or a spray of water that a little refreshes and moistens the leaves and a little nourishes (in the true sense of the word) the plant through the aerial roots.

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